17-1: Croissants

Croissants are a culinary item that have been around for well…a really long time. Crescent-shaped rolls are a part of several cuisines–one example would be the kifli from Eastern Europe, versus the well-known Western European version, like 17-1: Croissants. 🌙

17-1 Croissants
Wikipedia mentions that frozen pre-formed croissants are pretty readily available these days (and have been since the 1970s), so making this recipe’s truly a labor of love–it takes a good amount of effort, as noted above.

17-1 Croissants1
2 hours of prep time is optimistic–there’s a lot of rolling, pressing, forming, and general dough manipulation rounds broken up by fridge/oven intervals.

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Ingredients. There’s not a lot in terms of components–it’s more about technique for this recipe. I chose to include the poppy seeds, because why the hell not.

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Dry ingredients mixed together.

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Dissolving the yeast.

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Dropped in the egg.

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Started working in the flour after beating the egg in with the other ingredients.

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Probably over-floured it a bit–it’s a fine line between too tacky and too dry.

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Rolled it out with my dollar store pin. Cheap doesn’t necessarily mean bad–especially if it gets the job done.

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I didn’t go all the way over to the halfway point of the dough with my butter–it just seemed like SO much butter.

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Lots of folding, rolling, buttering, chilling.

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I kept it on this small cutting board while moving it in and out of the fridge.

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After doing the butter cycle 3 times, I did the final long roll out for the cutting of the shapes.

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I cut these (somewhat unevenly) with a bench scraper, but you can get an actual croissant cutter, which looks super cool and is totally going on my Amazon wishlist.

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Rolled them somewhat unevenly (to match the cuts), but I think they’ll still somewhat resemble traditional croissants.

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Egg washed.

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Poppy-seeded half of them–that way there’s a option for those who aren’t interested in poppy seed.

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After baking–they look pretty good (if not small and wonky).

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Despite their small size and weird formation, there are some nice flaky layers in there.

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Some look nicer than others.

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Broke one open for the photo plate so you can see the layers. These really were good–we made sandwiches with them, ate a few for breakfast, and sent the rest off with my dad to his work. If you’re interested in a lot of work (but for a potentially impressive reward), give them a try at least once. This one intimidated me for a while, but I’m glad I took the challenge.

Grade: A

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